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Foot peel masks are the latest beauty trend

Wednesday 27th March 2019
Podiatrists are seeing an increase in people turning to foot peel masks in a bid to get soft skin on their feet ahead of sandal season.
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The feet are the latest part of the body to come into focus in the context of on-trend beauty products, as the public clamours to get its hands on foot peel masks.

Many people are turning to the chemical peels to remove rough and calloused skin, as a more drastic method than more traditional approaches.

They usually come in the form of disposable boots infused with ingredients including lactic acid, salicylic acid, alcohol, glycolic acid, fruit extracts, oils and peptides.

Users are told to wear them for 20 minutes, allowing the solution to break down the connections in the dead skin cells and two to three days later, the top layer of skin peels off in dramatic fashion.

Fans of the products say they leave their feet softer than ever before and like the fact that they can be administered at home to avoid any inconvenience.

There’s debate among experts about whether these chemical peels are a good idea or not, with some suggesting they are less likely to lead to permanent damage or infection than foot files or foot razors.

Others caution that the active ingredients in foot peel masks are acids and should therefore be approached with care.

Both lactic acid and glycolic acid are known to cause irritation for many people with sensitive skin, so anyone contemplating using a mask or a new brand is encouraged to do a patch test first.

Anyone with warts, corns, calluses or open sores on their feet should definitely avoid foot masks in case they cause more extensive issues.

As the summer months draw closer it’s likely that more people will become interested in such treatments for their feet ready for wearing sandals.

Written by Angela Newbury

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