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Data shows where diabetes-related foot amputations are most common in UK

Friday 4th November 2016
Diabetes-related foot amputations are on the rise in the UK, new statistics show. Image: KatarzynaBialasiewicz via iStock
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Scarborough and Mansfield have been named the parts of the UK where the most foot or lower limb amputations are required due to complications arising from both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mismanagement.

As a result, this suggests that podiatrists based in these two locations are among the busiest in Britain.

New figures from the Hospital Episode Statistics and Quality and Outcomes Framework show that the number of diabetes-related foot amputations carried out since 2012 rose by 3,043 in comparison to the 2009-12 period, taking the total number for the last four years to 19,066.

In both Scarborough and Mansfield, 4.9 in every 1,000 people with diabetes required a lower limb or digit amputation between 2012 and 2015, with 4.8 per every 1,000 undergoing such a procedure in Kernow and Southend.

Meanwhile, the diabetes mismanagement-related amputation rate in Southampton and south-east Hampshire came in at 4.6 in 1,000, 4.5 per 1,000 in Blackpool, and 4.4 in 1,000 in Fareham and Gosport. Telford and Wrekin, and Somerset both recorded rates of 4.1 in every 1,000 diabetic patients.

Overall, this equates to an average of over 135 amputations being carried out in the UK each week due to people not managing their diabetes properly.

Stephen Ryan, regional head of Diabetes UK, explained that up to 80 per cent of these amputations could be avoided if diabetes care improves, with people needing to understand the importance of keeping their insulin levels stable.

He added that podiatrists have a key role to play in assisting with this, stating: "We need to make sure that everyone with diabetes gets good quality annual foot checks and knows how to reduce their risk of foot problems, and that anyone who has a foot problem gets the right care to prevent or treat it."

"It is particularly important that if anyone with diabetes has a foot infection, they get urgent attention from a multidisciplinary team of specialists," Mr Ryan concluded.

Written by Angela Newbury

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